Yoga Sequencing Lesson Plans

Yoga Sequencing Lesson Plans

Sequencing yoga classes is an art form. It is the process of organizing poses in a way that is both safe and satisfying for students. Good sequencing can make or break a yoga class.

There are many factors to consider when sequencing a yoga class. The first is the level of the class. Beginners need basic poses that will help them build strength and flexibility. More experienced students might want more challenging poses.

Another thing to consider is the time of class. If you have a one-hour class, you can’t fit in too many challenging poses. You need to sequence the poses in a way that will allow students to move through them comfortably.

You also need to consider the order of the poses. Some poses should be done at the beginning of the class, while others are better done at the end.

Here is a basic sequence that can be used in a beginner’s yoga class:

Sun Salutation (Surya Namaskar)

Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

Downward-Facing Dog Pose (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

Upward-Facing Dog Pose (Urdhva Mukha Svanasana)

Warrior I Pose (Virabhadrasana I)

Warrior II Pose (Virabhadrasana II)

Triangle Pose (Trikonasana)

Bridge Pose (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Final Resting Pose (Savasana)

This sequence can be modified to fit the needs of your students. For example, you might want to include a few basic poses in the Sun Salutation. Or, you might want to do more challenging poses in a one-hour class.

The most important thing is to be creative and use your intuition to create a sequence that is safe and satisfying for your students.

Easy Meditative Sequence Yoga For Beginners

The following easy sequence of yoga poses is designed for beginners, and should be practiced in a slow and mindful manner.

1. Corpse pose (Savasana):

This is a very simple pose that can be done at the end of any yoga practice. Simply lie down on your back, and let your body relax completely. Close your eyes, and take a few deep breaths, letting go of any stress or tension you may be feeling. Stay in this pose for 5-10 minutes.

2. Mountain pose (Tadasana):

This is a foundational pose that helps to build strength and stability in the body. Stand tall with your feet together, and press your heels firmly into the ground. Engage your core, and lift your chest up towards the sky. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

3. Downward-facing dog pose (Adho Mukha Svanasana):

This pose is a great way to stretch the hamstrings, calves, and back. Start in Mountain pose, and then bend your knees and slowly lower your body down towards the ground. Keep your hands shoulder-width apart, and press your heels firmly into the ground. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

4. Cat-cow pose (Marjaryasana-Bitilasana):

This pose is a great way to warm up the body, and it helps to stretch the spine and the chest. Start on all fours, with your hands directly below your shoulders and your knees directly below your hips. Inhale as you arch your back and look up towards the sky, and exhale as you round your spine and tuck your chin towards your chest. Repeat for 5-10 breaths.

5. Child’s pose (Balasana):

This is a great resting pose that can be done at any time during your yoga practice. Simply kneel down on the ground, and then sit your buttocks down between your heels. Rest your forehead on the floor, and extend your arms out in front of you. Stay in this pose for 5-10 breaths.

6. Warrior I pose (Virabhadrasana I):

This pose is a great way to build strength and flexibility in the legs and hips. Start in Mountain pose, and then take a large step forward with your left foot. Bend your left knee, and sink your hips down towards the ground. Reach your arms out to the sides, and hold for 5-10 breaths. Repeat on the other side.

7. Warrior II pose (Virabhadrasana II):

This pose is similar to Warrior I, but it is a little bit more challenging. Start in Mountain pose, and then take a large step forward with your left foot. Bend your left knee, and sink your hips down towards the ground. Reach your arms out to the sides, and extend your left leg out behind you. Hold for 5-10 breaths. Repeat on the other side.

8. Triangle pose (Trikonasana):

This pose is a great way to stretch the hamstrings, hips, and chest. Start in Warrior II pose, and then reach your right arm out to the side and your left arm up towards the sky. Keep your hips facing forward, and don’t let them turn towards the right. Hold for 5-10 breaths, and then switch sides.

9. Extended Triangle pose (Utthita Trikonasana):

This is a more challenging version of Triangle pose. Start in Warrior II pose, and then reach your right arm out to the side and your left arm up towards the sky. Keep your hips facing forward, and don’t let them turn towards the right. Bend your right knee, and reach your right hand down to the ground. Hold for 5-10 breaths, and then switch sides.

READ
Yoga For Pain In Shoulder Blade

10. Half Camel pose (Ardha Ustrasana):

This pose is a great way to stretch the chest and the abs. Start in Camel pose (see below), and then slowly lower your torso down towards the ground. Keep your hips facing forward, and don’t let them turn towards the ground. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

11. Camel pose (Ustrasana):

This pose is a great way to stretch the chest and the abs. Start in Table pose (see below), and then slowly rise up to Camel pose. Keep your hips facing forward, and don’t let them turn towards the ground. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

12. Half Moon pose (Ardha Chandrasana):

This pose is a great way to stretch the hamstrings, hips, and lower back. Start in Warrior II pose, and then reach your right arm out to the side and your left arm up towards the sky. Lunge forward with your left leg, and keep your right leg straight. Reach your right hand down to the ground, and hold for 5-10 breaths. Switch sides.

13. Tree pose (Vrksasana):

This pose is a great way to build strength and balance in the body. Start in Mountain pose, and then shift your weight onto your left foot. Bend your right knee, and place your right ankle on your left thigh. Reach your arms out to the sides, and hold for 5-10 breaths. Switch sides.

14. Half Lord of the Fishes pose (Ardha Matsyendrasana):

This pose is a great way to stretch the hips and the lower back. Start in Seated Staff pose (see below), and then twist your body to the right. Reach your left arm behind you and clasp your right hand. Keep your spine straight, and hold for 5-10 breaths. Switch sides.

15. Seated Staff pose (Dandasana):

This is a basic seated pose that helps to build strength and flexibility in the spine. Sit tall with your legs straight out in front of you. Press your palms into the ground, and extend your spine up towards the sky. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

Yin Yoga Sequence For Metal Element

The Metal Element is associated with the Lungs and Large Intestine organs in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The Metal Element is about organization, structure, and clarity. When the Metal Element is balanced, we are able to let go of what is no longer useful, and we can see things more clearly. We are able to find order and clarity in our lives.

A Yin Yoga sequence for the Metal Element can help to support the health of the Lungs and Large Intestine organs, and can help to bring balance to the Metal Element in your life. This sequence includes poses that will help to open and stretch the lungs and large intestine, and to release tension in the body. The sequence is also designed to be calming and grounding, to help you to find clarity and order in your life.

1. Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

Start in Mountain Pose, standing tall and grounded with your feet hip-width apart and your toes pointing straight ahead. Sink into your heels, and feel the weight of your body evenly distributed through your feet. Engage your quadriceps and lift your kneecaps, then press your hips forward and lengthen your tailbone down. Bring your hands to your heart center, and press your palms together. Take a deep breath in, and feel the energy of the Earth rising up through your feet and legs. As you exhale, relax your shoulders and let your head drop down. Stay here for a few breaths, and feel the peace and stillness of Mountain Pose.

2. Downward Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

From Mountain Pose, step your feet back into Downward Dog. Spread your fingers wide and press your palms firmly into the mat. Straighten your legs and press your hips up and back, lengthening your spine. Keep your head between your arms, and press your heels down into the mat. Hold for a few breaths, then step your feet back to Downward Dog.

3. Puppy Pose (Marjaryasana / Bitilasana)

From Downward Dog, come into Puppy Pose by walking your hands forward and lowering your forehead to the floor. Keep your hips high, and press your palms firmly into the mat. Hold for a few breaths, then lift your head and walk your hands back to Downward Dog.

4. Cat-Cow Pose (Marjaryasana / Bitilasana)

From Downward Dog, come into Cat-Cow Pose. Inhale as you arch your back and look up, then exhale as you round your back and tuck your chin. Keep your hips high, and move slowly and with control. Repeat for a few breaths, then return to Downward Dog.

5. Seated Forward Bend (Pashimottanasana)

From Downward Dog, come into Seated Forward Bend by walking your hands forward and lowering your torso down. Keep your legs straight, and if possible, clasp your hands behind your back. If you can’t clasp your hands, simply hold your elbows. Hold for a few breaths, then release your hands and slowly come back to seated.

READ
Beginner Yoga Positions

6. Wide-Legged Forward Bend (Prasarita Padottanasana)

From seated, extend your legs out to the sides and press your feet into the mat. Keep your spine long, and fold forward from the hips. If you can, clasp your hands behind your back, but if not, simply hold your elbows. Hold for a few breaths, then release your hands and slowly come back to seated.

7. Camel Pose (Ustrasana)

From seated, come into Camel Pose by reaching back and grabbing your heels with your hands. If you can’t reach your heels, simply hold on to your ankles or shins. Keep your spine long, and if possible, press your hips forward. Hold for a few breaths, then release your hands and slowly come back to seated.

8. Seated Twist (Parsva Janu Sirsasana)

From seated, extend your right leg out to the side and twist to the right. Place your left hand on the outside of your right thigh, and use your right hand to press down on the floor behind you. Keep your spine long, and look over your right shoulder. Hold for a few breaths, then release and switch sides.

9. Legs Up the Wall (Viparita Karani)

Finally, come into Legs Up the Wall by sitting next to a wall and scooting your hips up close to the wall. Extend your legs up the wall, and if you can, press your feet into the wall. Relax your arms by your sides, and let your head and neck relax. Stay here for a few minutes, and feel the grounding and calming effects of Legs Up the Wall.

Shoulder Sequence Yoga

There are many shoulder sequences in yoga. The one I am going to discuss is a sequence that I have found to be very effective in opening the shoulders and improving shoulder flexibility. This sequence is also a good warm-up for shoulder-intensive poses such as Downward Dog and Chaturanga Dandasana.

The sequence consists of the following poses:

• Child’s Pose
• Cat-Cow Pose
• Camel Pose
• Downward Dog
• Chaturanga Dandasana

1. Child’s Pose
Child’s Pose is a great pose for relaxing the shoulder muscles and opening the chest. To perform Child’s Pose, start on all fours with your hands shoulder-width apart. Bring your big toes together, and allow your knees to fall out to the sides. Sit back on your heels and extend your arms forward, palms down. Relax your forehead on the floor and breathe deeply. Stay in this pose for 5-10 breaths.

2. Cat-Cow Pose
Cat-Cow Pose is a great pose for warming up the shoulders and spine. To perform Cat-Cow Pose, start on all fours with your hands shoulder-width apart. Inhale as you arch your back and look up at the ceiling. Exhale as you round your back and tuck your chin into your chest. Keep your spine neutral as you switch back and forth between these two positions. Do 5-10 repetitions.

3. Camel Pose
Camel Pose is a great pose for opening the shoulders and chest. To perform Camel Pose, start in kneeling position with your knees hip-width apart. Place your hands on your lower back, and press your hips forward. Lean back and extend your arms straight up. Keep your back straight and your neck relaxed. Hold this pose for 5-10 breaths.

4. Downward Dog
Downward Dog is a great pose for opening the shoulders and stretching the hamstrings. To perform Downward Dog, start in plank position with your wrists under your shoulders and your legs extended straight back. Exhale as you press your hips up and back, and lift your heels off the ground. Keep your spine straight and your head neutral. Hold this pose for 5-10 breaths.

5. Chaturanga Dandasana
Chaturanga Dandasana is a great pose for strengthening the shoulders. To perform Chaturanga Dandasana, start in plank position with your wrists under your shoulders and your legs extended straight back. Exhale as you press your hips up and back, and lift your heels off the ground. Keep your spine straight and your head neutral. Lower your torso and arms to the ground, and keep your elbows close to your body. Hold this pose for 5-10 breaths.

Dance Like Yoga Sequence

The Dance Like Yoga Sequence is designed to help you move with greater ease, fluidity and grace. The poses are based on classical Hatha Yoga poses and are combined with simple dance steps to create a fun and uplifting sequence.

The sequence begins with a gentle warm-up, followed by a sequence of basic yoga poses. The dance steps are then added, and the sequence ends with a cool-down.

The Dance Like Yoga Sequence is a great way to improve your flexibility, strength and balance, and it’s also a lot of fun! So why not give it a try?