Yoga Opening Sequence

Yoga Opening Sequence

There are many yoga sequences that can be used to open the body, but this sequence is a good basic one to start with. This sequence is designed to open the hips, hamstrings, and spine.

1.Start in Mountain Pose.

2.Inhale and reach your arms up overhead.

3.Exhale and fold forward, hinging at the hips.

4.Allow your head and neck to relax down, and reach for your toes or the ground.

5.Stay here for a few breaths, then slowly rise back up to standing.

6.Inhale and reach your arms up overhead.

7.Exhale and step or jump your feet hip-width apart.

8.Turn your left foot out 90 degrees and your right foot in about 15 degrees.

9.Bend your left knee and squat down, keeping your right leg straight.

10.Make sure your left heel is pressing firmly into the ground, and clasp your hands together in front of your chest.

11.Stay here for a few breaths, then switch legs.

12.Repeat the sequence on the other side.

Yoga Sequences Advanced

yoga practitioners know that simply doing a sun salutation (Surya Namaskar) is not enough. To get the most out of your yoga practice, you need to sequence your poses correctly. A well-planned yoga sequence will improve your strength, flexibility and overall well-being.

There are many different types of yoga sequences, but all sequences should have three basic components:

1. A warm-up sequence to prepare your body for the more challenging poses

2. A main sequence of poses to work your body and mind

3. A cool-down sequence to end your practice and help you relax

The following is a basic yoga sequence that you can use to get started:

1. Warm-up Sequence:

-Cat-Cow pose
-Downward-facing dog
-Sphinx pose
-Upward-facing dog

2. Main Sequence:

-Mountain pose
-Tree pose
-Warrior I
-Warrior II
-Warrior III
-Half Moon pose
-Crow pose

3. Cool-down Sequence:

-Child’s pose
-Puppy pose
-Sphinx pose
-Bridge pose
-Corpse pose

Ashtanga Yoga First Sequence

The first sequence in Ashtanga Yoga is called the Primary Series. It is a set sequence of postures that is meant to purify the body and prepare it for more advanced practice. The postures in the Primary Series are all basic postures that most students are able to do.

The sequence begins with Sun Salutations to warm up the body. Then, there are a series of standing postures, followed by a sequence of sitting postures. The final sequence is a series of backbends.

The Primary Series is a great sequence for beginners because it teaches them the basic postures and how to sequence them together. It also helps to purify the body and prepare it for more advanced practice.

Yin Yoga Sequence For Back Pain

If you are one of the millions of people who suffer from back pain, you may find that traditional yoga poses offer little relief. This is because most yoga poses are designed to stretch and strengthen the muscles of the front of the body, while the muscles of the back are left relatively untouched. Yin yoga, on the other hand, is a more passive form of yoga that focuses on the connective tissues of the body, including the muscles, ligaments, and tendons. As a result, Yin yoga poses are a great way to relieve tension in the back and improve flexibility.

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The following Yin yoga sequence is designed specifically for people with back pain. It includes a variety of poses that target the muscles and connective tissues of the back. If you have back pain, be sure to listen to your body and avoid any poses that cause discomfort.

1. Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Child’s pose is a great way to start your Yin yoga sequence. It is a gentle stretch that targets the muscles and connective tissues of the back.

To perform child’s pose, start on your hands and knees with your hands placed shoulder-width apart. Bring your big toes together and tuck your heels under your buttocks. Spread your knees hip-width apart and sit back on your heels. Reach your arms forward and rest your forehead on the floor. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

2. Camel (Ustrasana)

Camel is a deep hip opener that stretches the muscles and connective tissues of the back.

To perform camel, start on your hands and knees with your hands placed shoulder-width apart. Bring your big toes together and tuck your heels under your buttocks. Spread your knees hip-width apart and sit back on your heels. Reach your arms forward and place your hands on your heels. Gently push your hips forward and arch your back. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

3. Cat/Cow (Marjaryasana/Bitilasana)

Cat/Cow is a gentle spinal flexion and extension exercise that helps to loosen the muscles and connective tissues of the back.

To perform cat/cow, start on your hands and knees with your hands placed shoulder-width apart. Bring your big toes together and tuck your heels under your buttocks. Spread your knees hip-width apart and sit back on your heels. Reach your arms forward and place your hands on your heels. Inhale as you slowly arch your back and look up at the ceiling. Exhale as you slowly round your back and tuck your chin to your chest. Repeat for 5-10 breaths.

4. Pigeon Pose (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana)

Pigeon pose is a deep hip opener that stretches the muscles and connective tissues of the back.

To perform pigeon pose, start in a downward dog position. Bring your right knee forward and place it behind your right hand. Keep your left leg extended behind you. Gently lower your body down to the floor. Hold for 5-10 breaths. Repeat on the other side.

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5. Frog Pose (Mandukasana)

Frog pose is a deep hip opener that stretches the muscles and connective tissues of the back.

To perform frog pose, start in a downward dog position. Bring your feet together and tuck your toes under your buttocks. Keep your knees bent and your hands placed shoulder-width apart. Slowly lower your body down to the floor. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

6. Seated Forward Bend (Paschimottanasana)

Seated forward bend is a deep hamstring and lower back stretch that loosens the muscles and connective tissues of the back.

To perform seated forward bend, sit on the floor with your legs straight out in front of you. Flex your feet and place your hands on the floor behind you. Slowly lean forward, keeping your back straight. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

7. Reclining Hand-To-Big-Toe Pose (Supta Padangusthasana)

Reclining hand-to-big-toe pose is a deep hamstring and lower back stretch that loosens the muscles and connective tissues of the back.

To perform reclining hand-to-big-toe pose, lie on your back with your legs straight out in front of you. Flex your feet and place your hands on the floor beside you. Slowly lift your right leg up and place your right hand on your big toe. Keep your left leg extended. Hold for 5-10 breaths. Repeat on the other side.

Hatha Yoga Sequence For Beginners

If you are new to yoga, or if you are just looking for a basic sequence to follow, this Hatha yoga sequence for beginners is a great place to start. This sequence will help to warm up your body and get you started on your yoga journey.

1. Start in Mountain Pose.

Mountain Pose is a great pose to start in because it is a basic, neutral pose that helps to ground you and center your energy.

2. Inhale and reach up to the sky with your fingertips.

Reaching up to the sky with your fingertips helps to lengthen your spine and open your chest.

3. Exhale and fold forward, keeping your spine long.

Folding forward helps to stretch your hamstrings and spine.

4. Inhale and reach up to the sky.

5. Exhale and fold forward.

6. Inhale and reach up to the sky.

7. Exhale and fold forward.

8. Inhale and reach up to the sky.

9. Exhale and fold forward.

10. Inhale and come up to standing.

11. Repeat steps 2-10.