Summer Yoga Sequence

Summer Yoga Sequence

for Beginners

Summertime is the perfect time to start a yoga practice! The weather is warm, the days are long, and there are plenty of outdoor spaces to practice.

If you’re a beginner, here is a sequence of yoga poses that will help you get started.

1. Mountain pose (Tadasana)

Mountain pose is a basic standing pose that helps you feel grounded and stable.

Stand with your feet together, and spread your toes wide. Engage your quadriceps and lift your kneecaps. Press your heels firmly into the ground, and lift your torso up tall. Clasp your hands together in front of your heart, and gaze straight ahead.

2. Downward-facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

Downward-facing dog is a great pose for stretching your hamstrings and calves, and it also helps to open your chest and shoulders.

Come onto all fours, and spread your fingers wide. Tuck your toes under, and lift your hips up and back. Keep your spine neutral, and press your heels firmly into the ground. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

3. Half Camel (Ardha Ustrasana)

Half Camel is a great pose for stretching your chest and shoulders.

Start in downward-facing dog. Step your right foot forward between your hands, and raise your torso up tall. Reach for your right heel with your left hand, and press your right hand against your back for support. Hold for 5-10 breaths, and then switch sides.

4. Warrior I (Virabhadrasana I)

Warrior I is a great pose for strengthening your legs and hips, and for stretching your chest and shoulders.

Start in Mountain pose. Step your left foot forward and turn your heel out. Raise your arms up overhead, and clasp your hands together. Bend your left knee, and sink down into your hips. Hold for 5-10 breaths, and then switch sides.

5. Triangle pose (Trikonasana)

Triangle pose is a great pose for stretching your hamstrings and hips, and for strengthening your legs and core.

Start in Warrior I pose. Turn your left foot so that the heel is pointing inwards. Extend your right arm straight out to the side, and reach for your right ankle with your left hand. Keep your spine long, and hold for 5-10 breaths. Then switch sides.

6. Corpse pose (Savasana)

Corpse pose is a great way to end your yoga practice. It helps to relax your body and mind, and it can also be used to meditate.

Lie down on your back, and spread your feet wide. Let your arms fall to your sides, and relax your shoulders. Close your eyes, and focus on your breath. Stay in Corpse pose for 5-10 minutes.

Creative Yoga Sequencing

is an art form that is constantly being refined. The sequencing of yoga poses is an important part of a yoga class, as it can create a flow and rhythm that helps students to move through the class with ease and to experience the benefits of each pose.

There are many different ways to sequence a yoga class, and there is no one “right” way to do it. However, there are a few things to consider when sequencing a yoga class.

First, you should consider the intention of the class. What are you trying to achieve? Are you trying to create a more vigorous flow, or are you trying to create a more relaxing and restorative class?

Then, you should consider the level of the class. Are you teaching a beginner class, or an intermediate or advanced class?

You should also consider the time of the class. If you have a one-hour class, you will not be able to fit in as many poses as you would if you have a two-hour class.

Finally, you should consider the students in your class. What are their abilities and limitations?

Once you have considered all of these things, you can begin to create a sequence for your yoga class.

There are a few basic principles that you can follow when sequencing a yoga class. First, always start and end your class with a relaxation pose. This allows students to wind down and relax after the class.

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Second, always go from easy to more difficult poses. This allows students to warm up gradually and to build strength and flexibility gradually.

Third, always consider the order of the poses. Some poses should be done before others, and some poses should be done after others. For example, in a Vinyasa class, you would typically do Sun Salutations before doing any other poses.

Finally, always be aware of the energy of the class. If the class is feeling energetic, you may want to do more vigorous poses. If the class is feeling more relaxed, you may want to do more restorative poses.

There are many different ways to sequence a yoga class, and the best way to learn is to experiment and to find what works best for you and your students. However, following the basic principles outlined above can help you to create a well-rounded and effective yoga class.

Yoga Standing Balance Sequence

When you stand, your bodyweight is distributed evenly between your two feet. This equilibrium is what allows you to stand upright and move around easily. However, when you introduce a challenge to your balance, such as by standing on one foot, your bodyweight is no longer evenly distributed. This creates a new equilibrium, which your body must work to maintain.

Maintaining your balance while standing is a complex task that requires the cooperation of many different muscles. To stay balanced, your body uses three systems: the postural muscles, the vestibular system, and the proprioceptive system.

The postural muscles are the muscles that keep you upright and stable. They include the muscles of the torso, such as the abdominals and the back muscles, and the muscles of the legs, such as the quadriceps and the hamstrings. These muscles work together to keep you upright and stable, even when you are standing on one foot.

The vestibular system is the system that helps you balance. It includes the inner ear, which contains the vestibular organs, and the brain, which processes the information from the vestibular organs. The vestibular system helps you keep your balance by detecting the position and movement of your head and body.

The proprioceptive system is the system that helps you know where your body is in space. It includes the muscles, joints, and skin, and it helps you maintain your balance by sending feedback to the brain about the position and movement of your body.

When you stand on one foot, the postural muscles, the vestibular system, and the proprioceptive system all work together to keep you balanced. The postural muscles keep you upright and stable, the vestibular system detects the position and movement of your head and body, and the proprioceptive system sends feedback to the brain about the position and movement of your body. This feedback allows the brain to adjust your balance as needed.

If you are having difficulty maintaining your balance while standing on one foot, you can use the three systems mentioned above to help you. The postural muscles can help you keep your balance by contracting and holding you upright. The vestibular system can help you keep your balance by providing information about the position and movement of your head and body. And the proprioceptive system can help you keep your balance by sending feedback to the brain about the position and movement of your body.

The Art Of Sequencing Yoga

Poses

Sequencing yoga poses is an important part of a yoga practice. When poses are sequenced correctly, they can help to open the body and mind, prepare for more challenging poses and lead to a feeling of internal bliss.

There are many different ways to sequence yoga poses. Some teachers choose to sequence poses based on their own personal preference or the needs of their students. Other teachers follow a set sequence that is prescribed by an asana or yoga tradition.

There are many benefits to sequencing yoga poses correctly. When the body is opened and prepared for more challenging poses, students are less likely to experience injury. Sequencing also allows students to explore different aspects of the yoga practice, and can lead to a deeper understanding of the poses. Additionally, sequencing can create a feeling of internal bliss, which is the ultimate goal of a yoga practice.

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Beach Yoga Sequence

The sun is shining, the waves are crashing and the sand is warm. It must be time for some beach yoga! This sequence is perfect for a morning or afternoon on the beach. It will energize and invigorate you while getting your body moving in all the right ways.

Preliminary warm-up:

Start by warming up your body with some basic sun salutations. This will get your heart rate up and your body ready for the sequence.

1. Start in downward dog. Inhale as you lift your gaze to the sky and exhale as you tuck your chin and fold forward.

2. Inhale as you step your left foot forward to meet your right hand and exhale as you fold into a low lunge.

3. Inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you step your back foot in to meet your hands in a low lunge.

4. Inhale as you lift your torso up and step your left foot back to meet your right hand in downward dog.

Repeat this sequence on the other side.

Beach Yoga Sequence:

1. Downward dog: From downward dog, inhale as you lift your gaze to the sky and exhale as you tuck your chin and fold forward.

2. Half Camel: From downward dog, inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you step your back foot in to meet your hands in a low lunge. Reach your arms up overhead and arch your back.

3. Low Lunge: From half camel, inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you step your back foot in to meet your hands in a low lunge.

4. Warrior I: From low lunge, inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you step your left foot back to meet your right hand in downward dog. Reach your arms up overhead and open your chest.

5. Warrior II: From warrior I, inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you step your right foot forward to meet your left hand in a low lunge. Reach your arms out to the sides.

6. Triangle: From warrior II, inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you reach your right arm down to meet your left ankle. Keep your back straight and your gaze forward.

7. Half Moon: From triangle, inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you reach your right arm up to the sky. Keep your left hand on your left hip and your gaze focused on your right hand.

8. Chair: From half moon, inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you bend your knees and lower your torso down as if you are sitting in a chair.

9. Child’s Pose: From chair, inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you reach your arms out in front of you and lower your torso down to the ground. Rest your forehead on the ground and relax your body.

10. Corpse Pose: From child’s pose, inhale as you lift your torso up and exhale as you relax your body onto the ground. Close your eyes and relax.

Take a few deep breaths in and out of each pose to really let the benefits sink in. Enjoy this beach yoga sequence on a sunny day!