Power Yoga Sequence Youtube

Power Yoga Sequence Youtube

Incorporate a power yoga sequence into your weekly routine to increase strength, flexibility and balance. Power yoga is a vigorous and physically demanding yoga style that can improve overall fitness and well-being. The sequence below is a basic power yoga sequence that can be modified to fit your needs and abilities.

The power yoga sequence begins with a basic sun salutation to warm up the body. Sun salutations are a series of poses that flow together and warm up the entire body. After the sun salutations, move in to the standing poses. These poses are designed to increase strength and flexibility in the legs and hips. The sequence finishes with a few basic seated poses to calm the mind and body.

The power yoga sequence can be modified to fit your abilities and needs. If you are new to yoga, start with the basic sun salutation and standing poses. If you are more experienced, add in the seated poses. Be sure to listen to your body and take breaks when needed.

The power yoga sequence:

1. Sun Salutation: A (Surya Namaskar A)
2. Standing Poses: Mountain (Tadasana), Triangle (Trikonasana), Warrior I (Virabhadrasana I), Downward Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)
3. Seated Poses: Cat/Cow (Marjaryasana/Bitilasana), Child’s Pose (Balasana), Seated Forward Bend (Pashimottanasana)
4. Finishing Poses: Corpse Pose (Savasana)

Beginner Intense Yoga Sequence

This beginner intense yoga sequence is designed to give you a good workout and help you build strength and flexibility. The sequence includes poses that work the entire body, and it can be tailored to fit your needs. If you are new to yoga, be sure to read the pose descriptions and safety tips before beginning.

Warm-Up:

Start by warming up your body with a few simple poses. Spend a few minutes in each of the following poses: Cat/Cow, Downward Dog, Child’s Pose, and Upward Dog.

1. Sun Salutation A:

This sequence of poses is called Sun Salutation A (Surya Namaskar A). It is a basic sequence that warms up the body and gets you ready for your workout.

Start in Mountain Pose (Tadasana).

Inhale and reach up to the sky with your arms.

Exhale and fold forward, keeping your spine straight.

Inhale and step or jump back to Downward Dog.

Exhale and step or jump forward to Plank Pose.

Inhale and lower down to Chaturanga Dandasana.

Exhale and press back up to Plank Pose.

Inhale and step or jump back to Downward Dog.

Exhale and step or jump forward to Mountain Pose.

Repeat the sequence 3-5 times.

2. Sun Salutation B:

This sequence of poses is called Sun Salutation B (Surya Namaskar B). It is a more advanced sequence that warms up the body and gets you ready for your workout.

Start in Mountain Pose (Tadasana).

Inhale and reach up to the sky with your arms.

Exhale and fold forward, keeping your spine straight.

Inhale and step or jump back to Downward Dog.

Exhale and lower down to Chaturanga Dandasana.

Inhale and press up to Upward Dog.

Exhale and lower down to Downward Dog.

Inhale and step or jump forward to Plank Pose.

Exhale and lower down to Chaturanga Dandasana.

Inhale and press up to Upward Dog.

Exhale and lower down to Downward Dog.

Inhale and step or jump forward to Mountain Pose.

Repeat the sequence 3-5 times.

3. Chair Pose:

Start in Mountain Pose (Tadasana).

Bend your knees and squat down, as if you are sitting in a chair.

Keep your spine straight and your chest lifted.

Hold for 1-3 breaths.

Release and come back to Mountain Pose.

Repeat 5-10 times.

4. Warrior I Pose:

Start in Mountain Pose (Tadasana).

Step or jump to the right and turn your right foot out 90 degrees.

Bend your right knee and squat down, as if you are sitting in a chair.

Keep your spine straight and your chest lifted.

Hold for 1-3 breaths.

Release and come back to Mountain Pose.

Repeat on the left side.

5. Triangle Pose:

Start in Mountain Pose (Tadasana).

Step or jump to the right and turn your right foot out 90 degrees.

Bend your right knee and squat down, as if you are sitting in a chair.

Keep your spine straight and your chest lifted.

Reach your right arm straight out to the side and your left arm straight up to the sky.

Hold for 1-3 breaths.

Release and come back to Mountain Pose.

Repeat on the left side.

6. Half Camel Pose:

Start in Camel Pose (Ustrasana).

Fold forward and place your hands on your shins.

Keep your spine straight and your chest lifted.

Hold for 1-3 breaths.

Release and come back to Camel Pose.

Repeat 5-10 times.

7. Half Lord of the Fishes Pose:

Start in Seated Forward Bend (Paschimottanasana).

Extend your legs out in front of you.

Bend your right knee and place your right foot on your left thigh.

Reach your left arm behind you and clasp your right hand.

Keep your spine straight and your chest lifted.

Hold for 1-3 breaths.

Release and come back to Seated Forward Bend.

Repeat on the left side.

8. Corpse Pose:

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Finish your workout by relaxing in Corpse Pose (Savasana).

Lie down on your back and let your arms and legs relax.

Close your eyes and breathe deeply.

Stay in Corpse Pose for 5-10 minutes.

After completing this sequence, you should feel energized and ready to workout! Remember to always listen to your body and modify the poses as needed. If you are new to yoga, be sure to consult a yoga teacher for more detailed instructions and safety tips.

Build Your Own Yoga Sequence

So you want to build your own yoga sequence? Great! Not only is it a fun and creative way to personalize your practice, but it can also help you to learn more about the poses and their benefits.

Before you get started, it’s important to understand a few things about yoga sequencing. First of all, a yoga sequence should always be based on your own needs and abilities. You should never attempt a pose or sequence that is beyond your current level of practice.

Secondly, it’s important to remember that yoga is a practice of balance. You should always strive to create a sequence that includes both forward bends and backbends, as well as poses that open the hips and stretches the spine.

Finally, you should always begin and end your sequence with a few simple poses to help you warm up and cool down.

Now that you understand the basics, let’s get started with creating your own sequence. The following sequence is designed to help you open your hips and stretch your spine.

1. Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

2. Standing Forward Bend ( Uttanasana)

3. Half Camel (Ardha Ustrasana)

4. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

5. Triangle Pose (Trikonasana)

6. Half Moon Pose (Ardha Chandrasana)

7. Hip-Opener Sequence:

a. Child’s Pose (Balasana)

b. Cow Face Pose (Gomukhasana)

c. Fire Log Pose (Agnistambhasana)

d. Pigeon Pose (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana)

e. Lizard Pose (Utthan Pristhasana)

8. Seated Forward Bend (Paschimottanasana)

9. Camel Pose (Ustrasana)

10. Bridge Pose (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

11. Corpse Pose (Savasana)

After completing this sequence, you may also want to include a few calming poses to help you wind down, such as Child’s Pose, Corpse Pose, or even a simple Savasana.

Remember, the best way to learn about sequencing is to experiment and find what works best for you. Be creative, and have fun!

Moderate Yoga Sequence

for Beginners

If you are new to yoga, it can be helpful to know a basic sequence of poses that you can do to warm up and wind down your practice. This sequence is designed for beginners, and can be done in any order.

Warm-Up Poses

1. Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

Mountain pose is a simple standing pose that can be used to warm up the body before beginning a yoga practice. It is also a great pose to practice in between other poses to help maintain your alignment.

To practice mountain pose, stand tall with your feet hip-width apart and your toes pointing straight ahead. Ground down through your feet and distribute your weight evenly. Engage your quadriceps and lift up through your spine, elongating your neck. Relax your shoulders and your face, and hold for 5-10 breaths.

2. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

Downward-facing dog is a classic yoga pose that is used to warm up the body. It is a great pose to practice if you are feeling stiff or tight, as it stretches the entire body.

To practice downward-facing dog, start in mountain pose. Step your feet back a few inches and then tuck your toes under. Lift up through your spine and press your hips back, extending your arms and legs. Keep your head between your arms and your heels pressed down. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

3. Cat-Cow Pose (Marjaryasana-Bitilasana)

Cat-cow pose is a gentle spinal twist that helps to warm up the body and loosen up the spine. It is also a great pose to help relieve tension in the neck and back.

To practice cat-cow pose, start in tabletop position. Inhale as you round your spine and tuck your chin, and exhale as you arch your spine and lift your head. Continue moving back and forth between these two poses, and hold for 5-10 breaths.

4. Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Child’s pose is a calming and restful pose that can be used to warm up the body or to end a yoga practice. It stretches the hips, thighs, and ankles, and can help to relieve tension in the lower back.

To practice child’s pose, start in tabletop position. Sit back on your heels and extend your arms forward. Bring your forehead to the floor, and relax your whole body. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

Main Sequence

1. Sun Salutation A (Surya Namaskar A)

Sun salutation A is a basic sequence of poses that is used to warm up the body. It is a great sequence to practice at the beginning of your yoga practice, or any time you need a quick warm-up.

To practice sun salutation A, start in mountain pose. Inhale as you reach your arms overhead, and exhale as you fold forward into a forward fold. Inhale as you step or jump your feet back to plank pose, and exhale as you lower down to the floor into chaturanga dandasana. Inhale as you curl your toes under and lift your torso and legs off the floor into upward dog pose. Exhale as you drop your hips to the floor and extend your arms forward into downward dog pose. Hold for 5-10 breaths, and then repeat the sequence.

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2. Half Moon Pose (Ardha Chandrasana)

Half moon pose is a challenging balance pose that strengthens and stretches the entire body. It is a great pose to practice if you are looking to improve your balance and coordination.

To practice half moon pose, start in mountain pose. Step your left foot back a few inches and then lift your left hand up to the ceiling. Reach your right hand down to the floor, and then lift your right arm up to the ceiling. Keep your hips facing forward, and hold for 5-10 breaths. Repeat on the other side.

3. Triangle Pose (Trikonasana)

Triangle pose is a deep hip opener that stretches the hamstrings and groin. It is also a great pose to improve your balance and alignment.

To practice triangle pose, start in mountain pose. Step your left foot back a few inches and then extend your left arm straight out to the side. Bend your right knee and reach your right hand down to the floor, keeping your hips facing forward. Hold for 5-10 breaths, and then repeat on the other side.

4. Warrior I Pose (Virabhadrasana I)

Warrior I pose is a powerful standing pose that strengthens the legs and opens the hips. It is a great pose to practice if you are looking to improve your balance and stability.

To practice warrior I pose, start in mountain pose. Step your left foot back a few inches and then bend your left knee so that your thigh is parallel to the floor. Reach your arms out to the sides, and hold for 5-10 breaths. Repeat on the other side.

5. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

Downward-facing dog is a classic yoga pose that is used to warm up the body. It is a great pose to practice if you are feeling stiff or tight, as it stretches the entire body.

To practice downward-facing dog, start in mountain pose. Step your feet back a few inches and then tuck your toes under. Lift up through your spine and press your hips back, extending your arms and legs. Keep your head between your arms and your heels pressed down. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

6. Camel Pose (Ustrasana)

Camel pose is a deep backbend that stretches the entire front of the body. It is a great pose to practice if you are looking to open your chest and improve your flexibility.

To practice camel pose, start in a kneeling position. Reach your hands back and grab onto your heels. Keep your hips pressed forward, and slowly extend your spine. Hold for 5-10 breaths, and then release your hands and come back to kneeling.

7. Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Child’s pose is a calming and restful pose that can be used to warm up the body or to end a yoga practice. It stretches the hips, thighs, and ankles, and can help to relieve tension in the lower back.

To practice child’s pose, start in tabletop position. Sit back on your heels and extend your arms forward. Bring your forehead to the floor, and relax your whole body. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

8. Corpse Pose (Savasana)

Corpse pose is a resting pose that is used to end a yoga practice. It is a great pose to practice if you are feeling tired or stressed, as it allows the body to relax and rejuvenate.

To practice corpse pose, start by lying down on your back. Relax your arms and legs, and let your whole body sink into the floor. Close your eyes and hold for 5-10 minutes.

Hatha Yoga Class Sequence

A hatha yoga class sequence typically starts with a few minutes of relaxation or meditation, followed by a warm-up sequence. The main sequence of the class usually consists of a number of standing poses, followed by a number of seated and reclining poses. The class usually ends with a relaxation or meditation pose.

The purpose of the warm-up sequence is to prepare the body for the main sequence of the class. The warm-up sequence typically includes a number of sun salutations, as well as some other poses that will increase the body’s heat and heart rate.

The standing poses are a key part of a hatha yoga class sequence. They help to build strength, flexibility, and balance. The seated and reclining poses are also important, as they help to stretch and relax the body.

The relaxation or meditation pose at the end of the class is a time to relax and reflect on the class. It is also a time to connect with the breath and the inner self.