Light On Yoga Sequences

Light On Yoga Sequences

Written by: Annie Carpenter

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When you are first starting out with yoga, it can be hard to know what poses to do in which order. There are many sequences of yoga poses that you can follow, but it is important to choose one that is appropriate for your level of experience and fitness.

The following is a basic yoga sequence that is perfect for beginners:

1. Sun Salutation A (Surya Namaskar A)

2. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

3. Cobra Pose (Bhujangasana)

4. Cat-Cow Pose (Marjaryasana-Bitilasana)

5. Child’s Pose (Balasana)

6. Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

7. Triangle Pose (Trikonasana)

8. Warrior I Pose (Virabhadrasana I)

9. Warrior II Pose (Virabhadrasana II)

10. Extended Triangle Pose (Utthita Trikonasana)

11. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

12. Camel Pose (Ustrasana)

13. Child’s Pose (Balasana)

14. Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

15. Standing Forward Bend ( Uttanasana)

16. Half Camel Pose (Ardha Ustrasana)

17. Standing Half Forward Bend (Ardha Uttanasana)

18. Chair Pose (Utkatasana)

19. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

20. Side Plank (Vasisthasana)

21. Triangle Pose (Trikonasana)

22. Half Moon Pose (Ardha Chandrasana)

23. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

24. Upward-Facing Dog Pose (Urdhva Mukha Svanasana)

25. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

26. Child’s Pose (Balasana)

27. Camel Pose (Ustrasana)

28. Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

29. Chair Pose (Utkatasana)

30. Triangle Pose (Trikonasana)

31. Warrior I Pose (Virabhadrasana I)

32. Warrior II Pose (Virabhadrasana II)

33. Extended Triangle Pose (Utthita Trikonasana)

34. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

35. Half Camel Pose (Ardha Ustrasana)

36. Standing Half Forward Bend (Ardha Uttanasana)

37. Child’s Pose (Balasana)

38. Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

39. Standing Forward Bend ( Uttanasana)

40. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

45 Minute Chair Yoga Sequence

Chair yoga is a great way to stay active and flexible, even if you don’t have a lot of time or space. In this sequence, we will work on opening up the hips and chest, and strengthening the arms and spine.

Start by sitting in a sturdy chair with your feet flat on the ground. Inhale and reach your arms up over your head, then exhale and fold forward, keeping your spine long. Hold for a few breaths, then inhale and reach your arms up overhead again.

Next, we will work on opening the hips. From seated, take your right leg out to the side and lean over to the right, keeping your spine long. Hold for a few breaths, then switch sides.

Now we will work on strengthening the arms and spine. Sit up tall and reach your arms straight out in front of you, parallel to the ground. Hold for a few breaths, then fold forward, keeping your spine long. Hold for a few breaths, then reach your arms straight back out in front of you.

Finally, we will do a gentle backbend. Sit up tall and reach your arms straight out in front of you. On an exhale, fold forward, keeping your spine long. Hold for a few breaths, then reach your arms overhead and clasp your hands together. On an inhale, lift your chest and look up, arching your back. Hold for a few breaths, then release your hands and sit up tall.

This sequence should take about 45 minutes. You can do it all at once, or break it up into smaller segments. If you have more time, you can also add in some basic yoga poses, such as Downward Dog, Triangle Pose, and Chair Pose.

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How To Build Yoga Sequence

Sequencing is an important part of teaching yoga. A well-crafted sequence can provide a balanced and effective practice for students of all levels. There are many different ways to sequence a yoga class, and the best way to learn is to experiment and find what works best for you.

One of the most important things to consider when sequencing is the intent of the class. What are you hoping to achieve? Are you working on strength, flexibility, balance, or relaxation? Once you have a sense of what you want to achieve, you can begin to put together a sequence that will help students achieve their goals.

Another important consideration is the order of poses. Some poses are more challenging than others, and it is important to sequence them in a way that allows students to work up to the more challenging poses. It is also important to consider the order of poses in terms of their benefits. Poses that open the hips should come before poses that require more strength and flexibility in the hips.

When putting together a sequence, it is also important to include a variety of poses. A sequence that includes a few standing poses, a few seated poses, and a few backbends is more balanced than a sequence that includes all standing poses, for example.

It is also important to vary the pace of the class. You may want to start with a few slower poses to allow students to settle in, and then move on to more challenging poses. You can also vary the intensity of the poses. For example, you can do a few gentle poses followed by a few more challenging poses.

When sequencing a yoga class, it is important to be creative and to experiment. There is no one right way to sequence a class. What works for one teacher may not work for another. The best way to learn is to try different things and find what works best for you.

Airplane Yoga Sequence

There’s no need to leave your practice at the door when you board a plane! With a little creativity, you can turn even the tightest of coach seats into your own personal yoga studio. Here is a sequence that will help you find length and space in your body, even when you’re up in the air.

1. Seated Forward Bend (Paschimottanasana)

Start in a comfortable seated position with your spine tall and your hands resting in your lap. Inhale as you reach your arms overhead, and then exhale as you fold forward, letting your head and neck hang down. Stay here for a few deep breaths, feeling the stretch along the entire back of your body.

2. Seated Angle (Upavistha Konasana)

From Paschimottanasana, use your hands to help you slowly slide your legs out to the sides, until you’re in a comfortable seated angle. Make sure your sit bones are firmly planted on the ground, and allow your spine to elongate as you relax your shoulders and neck. Stay here for a few deep breaths, feeling the stretch along your inner thighs and hips.

3. Cat/Cow (Marjaryasana/Bitilasana)

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Come to all fours, with your hands directly below your shoulders and your knees directly below your hips. Inhale as you arch your spine up and look up at the sky, and then exhale as you tuck your chin and round your spine, looking towards your navel. Continue moving back and forth between these two poses, feeling the stretch along your spine and belly.

4. Seated Twist (Parsva Balasana)

From Cat/Cow, extend your left arm out to the side and slowly lower your body down towards the floor. Stop when you feel a comfortable stretch in your right hip and glute. Stay here for a few deep breaths, and then switch sides.

5. Child’s Pose (Balasana)

From Seated Twist, slide your knees together and extend your arms out in front of you to come into Child’s Pose. Allow your forehead to rest on the floor, and let your hips sink down towards your heels. Stay here for a few deep breaths, feeling the stretch along your spine and hips.

6. Legs Up the Wall (Viparita Karani)

When you’re ready to release, scoot your seat close to a wall and then lie down on your back. Bring your legs up the wall and relax your arms by your sides. Stay here for a few minutes, feeling the stretch along your back and legs.

When you’re done, slowly roll to the side and use your hands to help you up to a seated position. Take a few deep breaths, and then slowly stand up. You’ll feel refreshed and rejuvenated, ready to take on your next adventure!

Prop Yoga Sequence

There is no one “right” way to do a yoga sequence, but there are some basic principles that will help you create a sequence that is both safe and effective.

1. Start with a warm-up.

Your body will be more flexible and less likely to get injured if you warm it up first. A good warm-up should include some gentle stretching and some basic yoga poses.

2. Sequence your poses in a logical order.

Some poses are more challenging than others, so it’s best to sequence them in a way that allows your body to progress gradually. Start with easier poses and work your way up to the more challenging ones.

3. Pay attention to your body.

When sequencing poses, always be aware of your own body and its limitations. If a certain pose is too challenging, skip it and move on to the next one.

4. Don’t hold poses for too long.

It’s important to hold poses for a certain amount of time, but you don’t want to hold them for too long. Holding a pose for too long can actually lead to injuries.

5. End with a relaxation pose.

A relaxation pose allows your body to relax and restore itself after a vigorous yoga sequence. It’s also a good way to wind down after a long day.