Iyengar Yoga Standing Pose Sequence

Iyengar Yoga Standing Pose Sequence

The following standing pose sequence is designed to help you improve your balance and stability. It also provides a great workout for your entire body.

1. Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

Mountain pose is the foundation for all standing poses. It is a simple pose that can be done by beginners and advanced practitioners alike.

To perform mountain pose, stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Engage your quadriceps and glutes to lift your heels up off the ground. Tuck your tailbone under and engage your abdominal muscles to lengthen your spine. Look straight ahead and hold for 30 seconds.

2. Warrior 1 (Virabhadrasana I)

Warrior 1 is a great pose for improving balance and stability. It also strengthens your legs and glutes.

To perform warrior 1, stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Step your left foot back about 3 feet and turn your left foot so that it is parallel to the front of your mat. Bend your left knee so that your thigh is parallel to the ground. Reach your arms out to the sides and hold for 30 seconds.

3. Warrior 2 (Virabhadrasana II)

Warrior 2 is a great pose for strengthening your legs and glutes. It also improves your balance and stability.

To perform warrior 2, stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Step your left foot back about 3 feet and turn your left foot so that it is parallel to the front of your mat. Bend your left knee so that your thigh is parallel to the ground. Reach your arms out to the sides and hold for 30 seconds.

4. Triangle Pose (Trikonasana)

Triangle pose is a great pose for improving balance and stability. It also strengthens your legs and glutes.

To perform triangle pose, stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Step your left foot back about 3 feet and turn your left foot so that it is parallel to the front of your mat. Bend your left knee so that your thigh is parallel to the ground. Reach your arms out to the sides and hold for 30 seconds.

5. Half Moon Pose (Ardha Chandrasana)

Half moon pose is a great pose for improving balance and stability. It also strengthens your legs and glutes.

To perform half moon pose, stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Step your left foot back about 3 feet and turn your left foot so that it is parallel to the front of your mat. Bend your left knee so that your thigh is parallel to the ground. Reach your arms out to the sides and hold for 30 seconds.

6. Chair Pose (Utkatasana)

Chair pose is a great pose for strengthening your legs and glutes. It also improves your balance and stability.

To perform chair pose, stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Bend your knees and squat down as if you are sitting in a chair. Reach your arms out in front of you and hold for 30 seconds.

7. Downward Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

Downward dog is a great pose for improving balance and stability. It also strengthens your legs, arms, and glutes.

To perform downward dog, stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Bend your knees and squat down as if you are sitting in a chair. Reach your arms out in front of you and hold for 30 seconds. Then, lift your hips up and back so that your body forms an inverted V. Hold for 30 seconds.

How To Create A Good Yoga Sequence

A yoga sequence is like a recipe for a meal. It is a series of poses that are chosen to create a specific outcome. When you create a yoga sequence, you first need to decide what you want to achieve. Do you want to work on your flexibility? Or your strength? Or maybe you just want to relax and de-stress.

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Once you know what you want to achieve, you can start to put together a sequence of poses that will help you get there. You can choose poses that are specifically designed to stretch or strengthen your body, or you can choose poses that are relaxing and stress-relieving.

It’s important to keep in mind that not every pose is right for every person. You may need to modify or skip certain poses depending on your body type or level of experience.

When creating a yoga sequence, it’s also important to be mindful of your breath. Make sure to synchronize your breath with the poses you are doing. This will help you to get the most out of your yoga practice.

Finally, be sure to take your time and relax between poses. Don’t rush through your sequence. This is your time to focus on your own body and mind and to achieve your specific goals.

Late Night Yoga Sequence

for Tight Hips

If you’re like most people, you sit all day long. Whether you’re at work, driving, or glued to your phone, sitting puts a lot of stress on your hips. This can cause tightness and stiffness, which makes it difficult to move freely. Yoga can help to loosen up your hips and improve your range of motion.

Here’s a sequence of poses that will help to open up your hips:

1. Child’s Pose: Start in a kneeling position, then fold forward, bringing your forehead to the floor. Stretch your arms out in front of you. Stay in this position for a few deep breaths.

2. Downward Dog: Come into a push-up position, then tuck your toes and lift your hips up to the sky. Hold for a few breaths.

3. Triangle Pose: Stand with your feet hip-width apart. Turn your right foot out 90 degrees and your left foot in 45 degrees. Reach your right hand towards the sky and your left hand towards the floor. Hold for a few breaths, then switch sides.

4. Pigeon Pose: Start in a runner’s lunge, with your right leg forward and your left leg back. Slide your left leg forward until your left ankle is below your right knee. Lower your torso down towards the floor, and reach your arms forward. Hold for a few breaths, then switch sides.

5. Hip Flexor Stretch: Kneel on the floor, then step your left foot forward so that your thigh is parallel to the floor. Lean forward, keeping your back straight, until you feel a stretch in your hip. Hold for a few breaths, then switch sides.

6. Camel Pose: Kneel on the floor with your thighs parallel to each other. Place your hands on your lower back, then press your hips forward and arch your back. Hold for a few breaths.

7. Frog Pose: Start in a Downward Dog position. Bend your elbows and lower your forearms to the floor. Bring your knees together and press your heels into the floor. Open your groin and press your elbows into the floor. Hold for a few breaths.

8. Seated Pigeon Pose: Sit with your legs crossed. Gently lean forward and rest your forehead on your knees. Hold for a few breaths.

9. Supine Pigeon Pose: Lie on your back and place your left ankle on your right thigh. Bring your right arm to your left ankle and press your ankle into your hand. Hold for a few breaths, then switch sides.

10. Corpse Pose: Lie flat on your back with your legs and arms relaxed. Close your eyes and breathe deeply for a few minutes.

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This sequence should be done once or twice a week to help loosen up your hips. If you have any injuries or medical conditions, please consult a doctor before performing these poses.

Slow Flow Hatha Yoga Sequence

This sequence is designed to increase flexibility and strength while calming the mind and body. It can be practiced in the morning or evening, and can be done standing, sitting, or lying down.

1. Mountain pose (Tadasana)

Start in mountain pose to ground yourself and connect with your breath. Stand with your feet hip-width apart, with your weight evenly distributed between your heels and toes. Engage your quadriceps and lift your kneecaps to straighten your legs. Press your hips forward and slightly up, and extend your spine upward. Relax your shoulders and allow your head to hang naturally. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

2. Downward-facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

From mountain pose, step or jump your feet back to come into downward-facing dog. Spread your fingers wide and press your palms firmly into the ground. Straighten your legs and press your heels toward the ground. Relax your head and neck and hold for 5-10 breaths.

3. Camel pose (Ustrasana)

From downward-facing dog, come into camel pose. Bring your hands to your lower back and press your hips forward. Lift your chest and tuck your chin slightly. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

4. Child’s pose (Balasana)

From camel pose, come into child’s pose. Bring your knees together and extend your arms forward. Rest your forehead on the ground and relax your hips and thighs. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

5. Supine hamstring stretch

Lie down on your back and extend your legs straight out. Bend one knee and place your foot flat on the ground. Reach your hand toward your bent knee and hold for 5-10 breaths. Switch legs and repeat.

6. Seated forward fold (Paschimottanasana)

Sit on the ground with your legs straight out in front of you. Bend forward at the waist and reach for your toes. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

7. Bridge pose (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

Lie down on your back and place your feet flat on the ground. Bring your knees into your chest and hug them close to your body. Lift your hips and torso into bridge pose. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

8. Corpse pose (Savasana)

Finish your sequence by lying down in corpse pose. Stretch your legs and arms out wide and relax your entire body. Close your eyes and breathe deeply for 5-10 minutes.

Pranayama Yoga Sequence

:

1. Sit in a comfortable seated position with your spine straight.

2. Inhale deeply and slowly through your nose, filling your lungs to the top.

3. Hold your breath for a moment, and then exhale slowly through your nose.

4. Repeat this cycle several times, focusing on the breath and the sensations it creates.

5. When you are finished, sit for a moment and relax.

This pranayama yoga sequence is a great way to start your practice. It is a simple and gentle way to open up the lungs and get the body ready for more strenuous poses. It is also a great way to calm the mind and focus on the breath.