Good Prenatal Yoga Sequence

Good Prenatal Yoga Sequence

for Expectant Mothers

Pregnancy is an incredible time in a woman’s life. Her body is changing rapidly to accommodate the growth of her baby, and she is preparing for the incredible journey of childbirth. A prenatal yoga practice can help expectant mothers connect with their growing baby, increase flexibility and strength, and prepare for childbirth.

The following sequence is a good starting point for a prenatal yoga practice. It can be done at any time during pregnancy, but is especially beneficial during the third trimester.

1. Seated Cat-Cow Pose: Start in a seated position with your spine tall and your shoulders relaxed. Inhale as you arch your back and look up, and exhale as you round your back and tuck your chin. Repeat 10 times.

2. Child’s Pose: Come to all fours, then lower your forehead to the floor. Extend your arms forward and relax your hips and back. Stay here for 5-10 breaths.

3. Downward-Facing Dog: From Child’s Pose, curl your toes under and press your hips up and back into Downward-Facing Dog. Hold for 5-10 breaths.

4. Cat-Cow Pose: Come back to Cat-Cow Pose, and repeat 10 times.

5. Seated Forward Bend: Sit on the floor with your legs straight out in front of you. Fold forward, keeping your spine long, and hang your head and arms below your shoulders. Stay here for 5-10 breaths.

6. Half Camel Pose: From Seated Forward Bend, reach for your right ankle and pull it toward your hip. Reach for your left ankle and pull it toward your hip. Hold here for 5 breaths, then switch sides.

7. Legs Up the Wall: Come to a seated position and then recline against a wall. Extend your legs up the wall and rest your arms at your sides. Stay here for 5-10 minutes.

8. Savasana: Lie flat on your back with your legs slightly apart and your arms at your sides. Close your eyes and relax your entire body. Stay here for 5-10 minutes.

Iyengar Yoga Sequence Adho Mukha Svanasana Shoulder Stand

This sequence is designed to open the shoulders and chest, while stretching the hamstrings and spine.

1. Start in Downward-Facing Dog.

2. Step your right foot forward between your hands, and lower your left knee to the floor.

3. Raise your left arm toward the ceiling, and turn your head to look up at your left hand.

4. Hold for five breaths, then switch sides.

5. From Downward-Facing Dog, lift your right leg up into the air, and extend it behind you.

6. Reach your left arm forward, and clasp your hands together.

7. Hold for five breaths, then switch sides.

8. Lower your right leg and left arm to the floor.

9. Bring your knees to your chest, and roll over onto your back.

10. Hold for five breaths, then repeat the sequence.

Sculpt Yoga Sequence Script

ing

There are many ways to approach sequencing a yoga class. You might start with a theme, or a particular focus for the class. You might choose poses that you want to work on, or that compliment each other. You might even start with a few basic poses and let the class flow from there.

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No matter how you sequence your class, it’s important to be clear and concise in your instructions. When you’re scripting your class, be sure to use simple, easy-to-understand language. You want your students to be able to focus on their practice, not on trying to decipher your instructions.

Here’s an example of a simple yoga sequence:

Start in Mountain pose.

Inhale and reach your arms up to the sky.

Exhale and fold forward, keeping your spine long.

inhale and stand up, reaching your arms up to the sky.

Exhale and fold forward, keeping your spine long.

Repeat this sequence two more times.

Finish in Mountain pose.

Great Yoga Core Sequence

for Athletes

There are many yoga poses that can help athletes improve their performance, but the following sequence is especially beneficial for targeting the core muscles.

1. Boat pose (Navasana)

This pose is excellent for strengthening the abdominal muscles, as well as the muscles around the spine.

To do boat pose, start by sitting on the floor with your knees bent and your feet flat on the ground. Lean back slightly and lift your feet off the ground, so that your thighs are parallel to the ground and your shins are perpendicular to the floor. Keep your back straight and your abdominal muscles engaged as you hold the pose for 30 seconds.

2. Plank pose (Phalakasana)

This pose is a great way to build strength in the core muscles, as well as the arms and shoulders.

To do plank pose, start in a push-up position, with your hands shoulder-width apart and your feet together. Keep your back straight and your abdominal muscles engaged as you hold the pose for 30 seconds.

3. Side plank (Vasisthasana)

This pose is a great way to tone the abdominal muscles and the oblique muscles.

To do side plank, start in plank pose. Then, lift your right hand and stack your right foot on top of your left. Keep your core engaged and your back straight as you hold the pose for 30 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

4. Bridge pose (Setu Bandha Sarvangasana)

Bridge pose is a great way to strengthen the abdominal muscles and the back muscles.

To do bridge pose, start by lying on your back with your feet flat on the ground and your knees bent. Lift your hips off the ground and clasp your hands together beneath your back. Keep your abdominal muscles engaged and your back straight as you hold the pose for 30 seconds.

5. Reverse curl (Salabhasana)

This pose is a great way to strengthen the abdominal muscles and the back muscles.

To do reverse curl, start by lying on your back with your feet flat on the ground and your knees bent. Bring your hands to your sides with your palms facing down. Then, lift your hips and chest off the ground and curl your head and shoulders towards your pelvis. Hold the pose for 30 seconds.

Mark Stephens Yoga Sequencing

There is no one definitive sequence for a yoga class. However, there are some basic principles that underlie all sequencing.

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The first consideration is the needs of the students. What do they want or need from the class? What are their goals?

The second consideration is the time of the class. What do you want to accomplish in the time you have?

The third consideration is the order of poses. What poses should come before and after others?

The fourth consideration is the type of class. Are you teaching a beginners’ class, an all-levels class, or a more advanced class?

The fifth consideration is the theme of the class. What focus do you want to give your students?

The sixth consideration is the energy of the class. What kind of energy do you want to create?

The seventh consideration is the environment. What kind of atmosphere do you want to create in your class?

Once you’ve considered these factors, you can begin to put together a sequence. Here’s an example of a basic sequence for a one-hour yoga class.

WARM-UP

The warm-up should gradually increase the heart rate and prepare the body for the work ahead. It should also prepare the mind for practice, by focusing on the breath and bringing awareness to the body.

1. Sun Salutations
2. Cat-Cow
3. Downward-Facing Dog
4. Upward-Facing Dog
5. Warrior I
6. Warrior II
7. Triangle Pose
8. Half Moon Pose
9. Chair Pose
10. Cobra Pose
11. Downward-Facing Dog

MEDITATION

A few minutes of meditation at the beginning and end of class can help students to focus and calm the mind.

1. Sit in a comfortable position with your eyes closed
2. Breathe deeply and focus on your breath
3. Notice the thoughts that come into your mind, and let them go
4. When you’re finished, sit for a few minutes in silence
5. Close your practice with a few final breaths

FOCUSED-WORK

In a yoga class, we often move back and forth between poses and different areas of the body. This section of the class is devoted to one specific area of the body and includes a sequence of poses that work on that area.

1. Hamstrings
2. Quadriceps
3. Hip Flexors
4. Glutes
5. Chest and Shoulders
6. Back
7. Neck and Throat

RELAXATION

The relaxation portion of the class provides an opportunity for students to let go of the day’s stresses and tensions. It should be a time to focus on the breath and allow the body to rest and heal.

1. Lie down in a comfortable position
2. Close your eyes and focus on your breath
3. Let go of the day’s stress and tensions
4. When you’re finished, lie for a few minutes in silence
5. Finish your practice with a few final breaths