Can Yoga Teachers Make Their Own Yoga Sequence

Can Yoga Teachers Make Their Own Yoga Sequence

?

There is no one definitive answer to this question. Some yoga teachers might create their own sequences, while others might use sequences that they find online or in a book. It really depends on the teacher’s preference and teaching style.

When it comes to creating your own sequence, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, make sure that the poses you choose are safe and appropriate for your students. You also want to make sure that the sequence is well-rounded and includes a variety of poses. Additionally, be sure to sequence the poses in a way that makes sense and is easy to follow.

If you’re looking for inspiration, there are plenty of online resources that can help you create a sequence. The Yoga Journal website, for example, has a number of helpful articles on sequencing. There are also many books on yoga sequencing available, such as “The Art of Yoga Sequencing” by Tias Little.

Ultimately, it’s up to the teacher to decide whether they want to create their own sequence or not. If you’re feeling adventurous, go for it! If you’re not sure where to start, there are plenty of resources available to help you get started.

Yoga Teacher Training Sequencing

Sequencing is a critical part of yoga teacher training. It is what we use to create classes that are safe, challenging, and effective. There are many different ways to sequence a yoga class, and the best way to find what works for you is to experiment.

There are a few basic principles of sequencing that can help you get started. First, start with some warm-ups to get the body moving and prepare it for more challenging poses. Next, move through the standing poses, which are a foundation of most yoga classes. Then, move into the more challenging poses. End the class with some relaxation poses to allow the body to rest and restore.

When sequencing a yoga class, it is important to consider the needs of the students. Some students may be new to yoga and need a slower, more beginner-friendly sequence. More experienced students may want a sequence that is more challenging and includes more advanced poses. You may also want to consider the time of day and the energy of the class. A morning class may be more energetic than an evening class.

There is no one right way to sequence a yoga class. The best way to learn what works for you is to experiment and find what works best for you and your students.

Crescent Moon Yoga Sequence

This yoga sequence is designed to open the heart and increase the flexibility of the spine. It can be practiced any time, but is especially beneficial before or after a yoga class.

1. Mountain pose (Tadasana)

Stand with your feet together, arms at your sides. Relax your shoulders and draw your navel in towards your spine.

2. Downward-facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

From mountain pose, bend your knees and place your hands on the floor, shoulder-width apart. Spread your fingers wide and tuck your toes under. Press into your hands and lift your hips towards the ceiling, creating an inverted V shape with your body. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

3. Forward fold (Uttanasana)

From downward-facing dog, walk your hands forward until your feet are flat on the floor. Bend your knees if needed. Allow your head to hang down, and relax your neck. Hold for five breaths.

4. Half Camel pose (Ardha Ustrasana)

From forward fold, place your hands on your hips and slowly lift your torso up. Lean back slightly and press your hips forward. Reach for your heels with your hands, or if you can’t reach your heels, reach for your toes. Hold for five breaths.

5. Child’s pose (Balasana)

From half camel pose, release your hands and knees and sit back on your heels. Bring your forehead to the floor and extend your arms in front of you, shoulder-width apart. Hold for five breaths.

6. Upward-facing dog (Urdhva Mukha Svanasana)

From child’s pose, press into your hands and feet and lift your torso and hips up towards the ceiling. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

7. Downward-facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

From upward-facing dog, release your hands and feet and walk your hands back to shoulder-width apart. Spread your fingers wide and tuck your toes under. Press into your hands and lift your hips towards the ceiling, creating an inverted V shape with your body. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

READ
Yoga Tips That Really Work

8. Forward fold (Uttanasana)

From downward-facing dog, walk your hands forward until your feet are flat on the floor. Bend your knees if needed. Allow your head to hang down, and relax your neck. Hold for five breaths.

9. Half Camel pose (Ardha Ustrasana)

From forward fold, place your hands on your hips and slowly lift your torso up. Lean back slightly and press your hips forward. Reach for your heels with your hands, or if you can’t reach your heels, reach for your toes. Hold for five breaths.

10. Child’s pose (Balasana)

From half camel pose, release your hands and knees and sit back on your heels. Bring your forehead to the floor and extend your arms in front of you, shoulder-width apart. Hold for five breaths.

11. Upward-facing dog (Urdhva Mukha Svanasana)

From child’s pose, press into your hands and feet and lift your torso and hips up towards the ceiling. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

12. Downward-facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

From upward-facing dog, release your hands and feet and walk your hands back to shoulder-width apart. Spread your fingers wide and tuck your toes under. Press into your hands and lift your hips towards the ceiling, creating an inverted V shape with your body. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

13. Forward fold (Uttanasana)

From downward-facing dog, walk your hands forward until your feet are flat on the floor. Bend your knees if needed. Allow your head to hang down, and relax your neck. Hold for five breaths.

14. Half Camel pose (Ardha Ustrasana)

From forward fold, place your hands on your hips and slowly lift your torso up. Lean back slightly and press your hips forward. Reach for your heels with your hands, or if you can’t reach your heels, reach for your toes. Hold for five breaths.

15. Child’s pose (Balasana)

From half camel pose, release your hands and knees and sit back on your heels. Bring your forehead to the floor and extend your arms in front of you, shoulder-width apart. Hold for five breaths.

16. Upward-facing dog (Urdhva Mukha Svanasana)

From child’s pose, press into your hands and feet and lift your torso and hips up towards the ceiling. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

17. Downward-facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

From upward-facing dog, release your hands and feet and walk your hands back to shoulder-width apart. Spread your fingers wide and tuck your toes under. Press into your hands and lift your hips towards the ceiling, creating an inverted V shape with your body. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

18. Forward fold (Uttanasana)

From downward-facing dog, walk your hands forward until your feet are flat on the floor. Bend your knees if needed. Allow your head to hang down, and relax your neck. Hold for five breaths.

19. Half Camel pose (Ardha Ustrasana)

From forward fold, place your hands on your hips and slowly lift your torso up. Lean back slightly and press your hips forward. Reach for your heels with your hands, or if you can’t reach your heels, reach for your toes. Hold for five breaths.

20. Child’s pose (Balasana)

From half camel pose, release your hands and knees and sit back on your heels. Bring your forehead to the floor and extend your arms in front of you, shoulder-width apart. Hold for five breaths.

21. Upward-facing dog (Urdhva Mukha Svanasana)

From child’s pose, press into your hands and feet and lift your torso and hips up towards the ceiling. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

22. Downward-facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

From upward-facing dog, release your hands and feet and walk your hands back to shoulder-width apart. Spread your fingers wide and tuck your toes under. Press into your hands and lift your hips towards the ceiling, creating an inverted V shape with your body. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

23. Forward fold (Uttanasana)

From downward-facing dog, walk your hands forward until your feet are flat on the floor. Bend your knees if needed. Allow your head to hang down, and relax your neck. Hold for five breaths.

READ
Can You Get Fit From Yoga

24. Half Camel pose (Ardha Ustrasana)

From forward fold, place your hands on your hips and slowly lift your torso up. Lean back slightly and press your hips forward. Reach for your heels with your hands, or if you can’t reach your heels, reach for your toes. Hold for five breaths.

25. Child’s pose (Balasana)

From half camel pose, release your hands and knees and sit back on your heels. Bring your forehead to the floor and extend your arms in front of you, shoulder-width apart. Hold for five breaths.

26. Upward-facing dog (Urdhva Mukha Svanasana)

From child’s pose, press into your hands and feet and lift your torso and hips up towards the ceiling. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths.

27. Downward-facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

From upward-facing dog, release your hands and feet and walk your hands back to shoulder-width apart. Spread your fingers wide and tuck your toes under. Press into your hands and lift your hips towards the ceiling, creating an inverted V shape with your body. Keep your head between your upper arms and your spine lengthened. Hold for five breaths

Stretch And Restore Yoga Sequence

The body is like a rubber band. When it is stretched beyond its natural limit, it becomes taut and brittle. In order to maintain its elasticity, it needs to be periodically restored through a process of relaxation and rejuvenation. This is where yoga comes in.

The yoga sequence below is designed to stretch and restore the body. It is best performed after a light cardio workout, when the body is warm and receptive.

Begin by standing in Tadasana (Mountain Pose), with your feet together and your arms by your sides.

Inhale and reach up to the sky, lengthening your spine.

Exhale and fold forward, hinging at your hips.

Allow your head to hang down, and take a few deep breaths.

Inhale and straighten your legs, reaching up to the sky.

Exhale and fold forward, hinging at your hips.

Allow your head to hang down, and take a few deep breaths.

Inhale and step your left foot back, into a low lunge.

Exhale and fold forward, hinging at your hips.

Allow your head to hang down, and take a few deep breaths.

Inhale and step your right foot back, into a low lunge.

Exhale and fold forward, hinging at your hips.

Allow your head to hang down, and take a few deep breaths.

Inhale and come back to Tadasana.

Exhale and relax.

Yoga Mala Sequence

A yoga mala is a sequence of 108 yoga poses. The poses are generally held for a certain number of breaths or repetitions. The sequence is designed to create a flow of energy through the body and to open and balance the chakras.

The yoga mala sequence can be practiced alone or as part of a yoga class. It is a good sequence to practice at the beginning or end of a yoga class.

The poses in the yoga mala sequence are:

1. Mountain pose
2. Downward-facing dog
3. Plank pose
4. Cobra pose
5. Upward-facing dog pose
6. Downward-facing dog pose
7. Camel pose
8. Warrior I pose
9. Warrior II pose
10. Reverse warrior pose
11. Triangle pose
12. Half moon pose
13. Chair pose
14. Warrior III pose
15. Half Camel pose
16. Fish pose
17. Seated forward bend
18. Seated twist
19. Child’s pose
20. Garland pose
21. Happy baby pose
22. Supine hand-to-big-toe pose
23. Bridge pose
24. Camel pose
25. Wheel pose
26. Triangle pose
27. Half moon pose
28. Low lunge
29. Cobra pose
30. Downward-facing dog pose
31. Fish pose
32. Half Camel pose
33. Seated forward bend
34. Seated twist
35. Child’s pose
36. Triangle pose
37. Half moon pose
38. Happy baby pose
39. Bridge pose
40. Wheel pose
41. Warrior III pose
42. Triangle pose
43. Half Camel pose
44. Fish pose
45. Supine hand-to-big-toe pose
46. Corpse pose