40 Minute Yin Yoga Sequence

40 Minute Yin Yoga Sequence

for a Healthy Back

The human spine is a marvel of engineering. It is able to support the weight of our heads and upper bodies, while also allowing us to move in all directions. The spine is made up of 33 vertebrae, which are separated by discs that act as shock absorbers. The vertebrae are held together by ligaments and muscles, and are in turn protected by the ribcage.

The spinal column is susceptible to a variety of injuries and conditions, including disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and scoliosis. A regular yoga practice can help to keep the spine healthy and strong, and can help to prevent or alleviate back pain.

The following Yin yoga sequence is designed to help to keep the spine healthy and flexible. The sequence can be done either in a seated or reclining position.

1. Seated spinal twist

This pose helps to stretch and massage the spinal muscles and ligaments. It also helps to relieve tension in the lower back.

Start by sitting in a comfortable position with your spine straight. Bend your right knee and place your foot on the floor. Inhale and twist your torso to the right, placing your left hand on your right knee. Hold for five breaths, then exhale and return to the starting position. Repeat on the other side.

2. Seated forward bend

This pose helps to stretch the muscles in the back of the legs, and also stretches the spine and the hamstrings.

Start by sitting in a comfortable position with your spine straight. Inhale and reach your arms overhead. Exhale and fold forward, reaching your hands toward the floor. Hold for five breaths, then inhale and return to the starting position.

3. Child’s pose

This pose helps to stretch the hips, thighs, and lower back.

Start by kneeling on the floor with your hands on the floor in front of you. Touch your big toes together and sit back on your heels. Exhale and fold forward, reaching your hands toward the floor. Hold for five breaths, then inhale and return to the starting position.

4. Reclining spinal twist

This pose helps to stretch and massage the spinal muscles and ligaments. It also helps to relieve tension in the lower back.

Start by lying on your back with your legs straight. Bend your right knee and place your foot on the floor. Inhale and twist your torso to the right, placing your left hand on your right knee. Hold for five breaths, then exhale and return to the starting position. Repeat on the other side.

5. Reclining hamstring stretch

This pose helps to stretch the hamstring muscles and the lower back.

Start by lying on your back with your legs straight. Bend your right knee and place your foot on the floor. Inhale and raise your left leg toward the ceiling, keeping your left foot flexed. Hold for five breaths, then exhale and lower your leg. Repeat on the other side.

6. Reclining pigeon pose

This pose helps to stretch the hips and thighs.

Start by lying on your back with your legs straight. Bend your right knee and place your foot on the floor. Inhale and raise your left leg toward the ceiling, keeping your left foot flexed. Exhale and lower your left leg to the right, allowing your knee to drop toward the floor. Hold for five breaths, then inhale and return to the starting position. Repeat on the other side.

7. Reclining big toe pose

This pose helps to stretch the hamstrings and the lower back.

Start by lying on your back with your legs straight. Bend your right knee and place your foot on the floor. Inhale and raise your left leg toward the ceiling, keeping your left foot flexed. Exhale and lower your left leg to the right, allowing your knee to drop toward the floor. Reach your left hand toward your left ankle and hold for five breaths. Inhale and return to the starting position. Repeat on the other side.

8. Corpse pose

This pose helps to relax the body and mind.

Start by lying on your back with your legs straight. Place your arms at your sides with your palms facing up. Close your eyes and relax for five minutes.

Yoga Sequence For Anxiety

Are you feeling anxious? Do you feel like you can’t control your thoughts and that everything is spinning out of control? Yoga may be a great way to help you calm down and focus. Here is a yoga sequence specifically designed to help you manage anxiety.

1. Child’s pose (Balasana)

Child’s pose is a great way to start your yoga sequence. It helps to calm the mind and relax the body. To do child’s pose, kneel on the floor and then fold forward, resting your forehead on the floor. Extend your arms out in front of you and relax into the pose.

2. Downward facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

Downward facing dog is a great pose to help you feel grounded and centred. To do this pose, start in a kneeling position. Then, place your hands on the floor in front of you and press your hips up in to the air, extending your legs out behind you. Keep your head and spine in a straight line and relax your shoulders. Hold the pose for a few breaths.

3. Camel pose (Ustrasana)

Camel pose is a great pose to open up the chest and help you breathe more freely. To do this pose, start in a kneeling position. Then, reach back and grab your heels, pulling your torso up and back. Keep your head up and your spine in a straight line. Hold the pose for a few breaths.

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4. Cat-Cow pose (Marjaryasana-Bitilasana)

Cat-Cow pose is a great way to warm up the spine and the body. To do this pose, start on your hands and knees. Then, arch your back up and tuck your chin in to your chest. Hold for a few breaths. Then, reverse the pose and press your spine down and lift your head and chest up. Hold for a few breaths.

5. Seated forward fold (Paschimottanasana)

Seated forward fold is a great pose to help you relax and stretch the spine. To do this pose, sit on the floor with your legs straight out in front of you. Then, fold forward, reaching for your toes. Hold the pose for a few breaths.

6. Supine twist (Supta Matsyendrasana)

Supine twist is a great pose to help you relax and stretch the spine. To do this pose, lie on your back and hug your knees in to your chest. Then, slowly lower your knees to one side, keeping your head and shoulders on the floor. Hold the pose for a few breaths, then switch sides.

7. Corpse pose (Savasana)

Corpse pose is a great way to end your yoga sequence. It helps to calm the mind and relax the body. To do this pose, simply lie on your back and relax. Close your eyes and focus on your breath. Stay in the pose for 5-10 minutes.

Free Yoga Class Sequences

There is no need to feel intimidated by yoga class sequences. With a little knowledge, you can easily follow along and reap the benefits of a yoga class.

The following sequences are designed to give you a taste of a typical yoga class. Each sequence includes a variety of poses that will work your body in different ways.

If you are a beginner, try to hold each pose for five breaths. If you are more experienced, try to hold each pose for 10 breaths.

Don’t be afraid to modify the poses to fit your own needs. Always listen to your body and make sure to respect your limitations.

If you are pregnant or have any other health concerns, please consult your doctor before participating in a yoga class.

Sun Salutation A

The sun salutation is a basic sequence that is often used in yoga classes. It is a great way to warm up your body and prepare for the more challenging poses.

1. Start in Mountain Pose.

2. Inhale and reach your arms overhead.

3. Exhale and fold forward, keeping your spine lengthened.

4. Inhale and step your right foot back into a lunge.

5. Exhale and lower your left knee to the ground.

6. Inhale and raise your torso back to standing.

7. Exhale and step your left foot back into a lunge.

8. Inhale and raise your right knee to the ground.

9. Exhale and return to standing.

10. Inhale and reach your arms overhead.

11. Exhale and fold forward.

12. Repeat steps 2-11.

Sun Salutation B

1. Start in Mountain Pose.

2. Inhale and reach your arms overhead.

3. Exhale and fold forward, keeping your spine lengthened.

4. Inhale and step your right foot back into a lunge.

5. Exhale and lower your left knee to the ground.

6. Inhale and raise your torso back to standing.

7. Exhale and step your left foot back into a lunge.

8. Inhale and raise your right knee to the ground.

9. Exhale and lower your left knee to the ground.

10. Inhale and raise your torso back to standing.

11. Exhale and reach your arms overhead.

12. Repeat steps 2-11.

Camel Pose

The camel pose is a deep backbend that stretches your chest and hips. It can be a challenging pose, but it is also very rewarding.

1. Start in Tabletop Pose.

2. Place your hands on your hips.

3. Inhale and lift your torso and hips up off the ground.

4. Exhale and reach back for your heels.

5. Keep your neck lengthened and your gaze forward.

6. Hold for five breaths.

7. To release, exhale and slowly lower your torso and hips to the ground.

8. Rest in Child’s Pose.

Downward-Facing Dog

The downward-facing dog is a basic yoga pose that stretches your hamstrings, calves, and shoulders. It is also a great way to release tension in your neck and upper back.

1. Start in Tabletop Pose.

2. Place your hands on the ground and step your feet back.

3. Keep your feet hip-width apart and your hands shoulder-width apart.

4. Inhale and lift your hips and tailbone up towards the ceiling.

5. Keep your head hanging down between your arms.

6. Hold for five breaths.

7. To release, exhale and slowly lower your hips and tailbone to the ground.

8. Rest in Child’s Pose.

Warrior I

The warrior I pose is a basic standing pose that stretches your hips, chest, and shoulders. It is a great pose to practice before beginning a sequence.

1. Start in Mountain Pose.

2. Step your left foot forward and turn your left heel inwards.

3. Bend your left knee and sink down into a lunge.

4. Reach your arms overhead and clasp your hands together.

5. Keep your spine long and your chest open.

6. Hold for five breaths.

7. To release, exhale and slowly lower your left knee to the ground.

8. Step your right foot back to meet your left foot.

9. Repeat steps 2-8 on the other side.

Warrior II

The warrior II pose is a basic standing pose that stretches your hips, chest, and shoulders. It is a great pose to practice before beginning a sequence.

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1. Start in Mountain Pose.

2. Step your left foot forward and turn your left heel inwards.

3. Bend your left knee and sink down into a lunge.

4. Reach your arms out to the sides and turn your left palm up.

5. Keep your spine long and your chest open.

6. Hold for five breaths.

7. To release, exhale and slowly lower your left knee to the ground.

8. Step your right foot back to meet your left foot.

9. Repeat steps 2-8 on the other side.

Tree Pose

The tree pose is a basic balance pose that strengthens your ankles and improves your balance. It is a great pose to practice before beginning a sequence.

1. Start in Mountain Pose.

2. Shift your weight onto your left foot.

3. Bend your right knee and place your right foot on your left ankle.

4. Press your right foot into your left ankle and lengthen your spine.

5. Hold for five breaths.

6. To release, exhale and slowly lower your right foot to the ground.

7. Repeat steps 1-6 on the other side.

Ashtanga Yoga Sequence Variation

The Ashtanga Yoga sequence is a sequence of poses that are typically performed in a specific order. However, there is some variation possible within the sequence.

The first variation is the use of vinyasa. Vinyasa is the linking of breath and movement. In Ashtanga Yoga, vinyasa is used to link the poses together. However, there is some variation possible within the use of vinyasa. For example, you can use vinyasa to link the poses together or you can use it to flow through the poses.

The second variation is the use of dristi. Dristi is the focus point for the eyes. In Ashtanga Yoga, dristi is used to help with the alignment of the body. However, there is some variation possible within the use of dristi. For example, you can use dristi to help with the alignment of the body or you can use it to help with the focus of the mind.

The third variation is the use of bandhas. Bandhas are the locks of the body. In Ashtanga Yoga, bandhas are used to help with the alignment of the body and the flow of the energy. However, there is some variation possible within the use of bandhas. For example, you can use bandhas to help with the alignment of the body and the flow of the energy or you can use them to help with the strength of the poses.

The fourth variation is the use of mudras. Mudras are the hand positions. In Ashtanga Yoga, mudras are used to help with the flow of the energy. However, there is some variation possible within the use of mudras. For example, you can use mudras to help with the flow of the energy or you can use them to help with the focus of the mind.

The fifth variation is the use of pranayama. Pranayama is the control of the breath. In Ashtanga Yoga, pranayama is used to help with the flow of the energy. However, there is some variation possible within the use of pranayama. For example, you can use pranayama to help with the flow of the energy or you can use it to help with the focus of the mind.

The sixth variation is the use of sequencing. Sequencing is the order of the poses. In Ashtanga Yoga, sequencing is used to help with the alignment of the body and the flow of the energy. However, there is some variation possible within the use of sequencing. For example, you can use sequencing to help with the alignment of the body and the flow of the energy or you can use it to help with the flow of the poses.

The seventh variation is the use of intensity. Intensity is the level of effort put into the poses. In Ashtanga Yoga, intensity is used to help with the alignment of the body and the flow of the energy. However, there is some variation possible within the use of intensity. For example, you can use intensity to help with the alignment of the body and the flow of the energy or you can use it to help with the strength of the poses.

Trauma Sensitive Yoga Sequence

Trauma Sensitive Yoga is a form of yoga that is specifically designed to be safe and beneficial for people who have experienced trauma. The sequence of poses is based on the principles of trauma-informed care, which takes into account the physical, psychological, and emotional impacts of trauma.

Trauma-informed care is a relatively new field that is still evolving, but the basic premise is that people who have experienced trauma should be treated with compassion and respect, and their needs should be considered in all aspects of their care. This includes everything from the way the environment is structured to the way people are treated by staff.

Trauma Sensitive Yoga is based on the same principles. It is designed to be a safe and welcoming space for people who have experienced trauma, and the poses are chosen to be beneficial for both the body and the mind. The sequence is slow and gentle, and there is no competitive or strenuous yoga.

Trauma Sensitive Yoga is a great way to start your day, or to use as a break during the day. It is also a great way to relax and de-stress after a long day.